How to spot a diet scam

MomsEveryday

America seems to have an obsession with weight, specifically, how to lose it. There are many different diets and weight loss products, many of which are bogus.

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, some ingredients in supplements and herbal products can be dangerous, and there are no foods or pills that magically burn fat.

They recommend avoiding diet plans or products that make the following claims:

  • Rapid weight loss. Healthy plans aim for a loss of no more than half to one pound a week.
  • Quantities and limitations. Avoid diets that eliminate entire food groups, as well as those that say you can eat an unlimited amount of certain foods.
  • Specific food combinations. There is no evidence that combining certain foods or eating them at specific times of the day will help with weight loss.
  • Rigid menus. Limiting food choices or following rigid meal plans are not sustainable.

Remember, if a claim sounds too good to be true, it probably is.