The Will To Want To

Paul Isenberg

Hey Dads - I am so sorry that it has taken me this long to post because believe me this helps me more than it could ever help anyone that reads it.

Have you ever found yourself knowing and choosing to do well but wanting and desiring to do wrong?

Now don’t read into this too much, but take for example attending worship service on the first day of the week; how many times have we known we should be there but wished and wanted to be elsewhere? Is that really what God has in mind for us as worship, or is it supposed to be a desire?

I figured out something last week: as I prioritize my life, it’s not done on paper but in actions. When God becomes my internal priority then it shows externally. Today this isn’t a Christianity post, but it is to ask how are we prioritizing our kids? When asked, we always say, “Well, my kids are my first priority,” but who got more of our attention - the television or the child?

When we blow our money for 18 years and haven’t planned for our children to go to college so now they pay five times for their school I ask where are our priorities? When our child gets in trouble at school for doing what we do at home, where are our priorities? When our child cries because what it enjoys the most is playing its favorite game, or goes to class and is embarrassed they never heard of volleyball, or has a job interview and has no speaking skills because we raised her with a television full of slang, where are our priorities?

Bottom line fathers, where we plan to be and what we plan to be starts with prioritizing our lives. Fathers, raising children is a task and prioritizing our tasks is important, it is enjoyable at times but supposed to be something we work at. Where are our priorities?

SO I ASK, DADS - HOW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU WANTED TO BE A GOOD DAD, OR THINK YOU CHOSE TO BE A GOOD DAD? PRIORITIZING CAN HELP US QUICKLY TURN FROM WANTING TO ACCOMPLISHING FATHERING GOALS.



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