Address: 1805 27th Street Portsmouth, OH 45662 View Map
Phone: (606) 356-5000
Email: roya@somc.org
Website:

About Us

Southern Ohio Medical Center (SOMC) is a 222-bed 501(C)(3) not-for-profit hospital in Portsmouth, Ohio, providing emergency and surgical care, as well as a wide range of other health-care services; SOMC has been in the community since 1954. It is the mission of SOMC to truly make a difference in the lives of patients, employees, and the surrounding community.

The operation of SOMC follows guidelines of The Joint Commission, the nation's predominant standards-setting body in health care, and SOMC has received top honors from that organization for meeting standards. SOMC currently employs 2,200 full time employees and part time employees, has a medical staff of more than 140 physicians and specialists, and is supported by approximately 800 regular volunteers.

SOMC, a rural hospital and one of Fortune Magazine’s 100 Best Places to Work in America, is striving to provide the highest quality of care to make healthcare a remarkable experience for everyone served. It is the mission of SOMC to truly make a difference in the lives of patients, employees, and the surrounding community. The goals of SOMC encompass the mission and the organization’s five strategic values, which include achieving and sustaining exceptional results in safety, quality of care, service, relationships, and financial performance.

SOMC was ranked first on Ohio’s Top Employers list in 2010 and has been on the list for five consecutive years. SOMC was also named one of Fortune Magazine’s 100 Best Places to Work in America. SOMC is the first hospital in the region to achieve the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s highest honor, the Magnet recognition status. This honor, given to only 6% of hospitals nationwide, recognizes national excellence in nursing. Receiving the national gold standard for safety and health, SOMC has been awarded the Voluntary Protection Program Star Designation. Voluntary Protection Program is a cooperative program of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). By earning Voluntary Protection Program Star status, SOMC is in the top 1 percent of hospitals nationwide in safety excellence.

 

 

 

Southern Ohio Medical Center FAQ

Q: What exactly is PM&R?
A:
PM&R stands for physical medicine and rehabilitation. In this specialty, we treat a wide spectrum of disorders, primarily focused on the neuro-musculoskeletal system. PM&R doctors complete 4 years of medical school, 1 year of internship and 3 years of a PM&R residency.

Q: What kinds of conditions do you treat?
A:
We treat anything from knee arthritis to stroke-related impairments and much more. PM&R doctors are trained to treat musculoskeletal conditions. We’re the doctors you may see for sports-related injuries, degenerative joint conditions, and back or neck pain. We work closely with physical and occupational therapists, and we are often the doctors overseeing your progress in therapy. We are able to manage many of these conditions and should they become too severe, we often refer to our orthopedic and neurosurgical colleagues for surgical interventions. AS well, we are trained to treat neurologic conditions such as stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury. We spend a great deal of time in our residency working in the inpatient rehab setting overseeing patients who have sustained these conditions. We are finding that the sooner the patient gets to rehab, more often than not, the better. So once a patient is stabilized in the hospital, he or she is fairly quickly transferred to the rehab unit to begin the process of regaining any functional losses.

Q: What kind of procedures or interventions do you do?
A:
I work in the outpatient setting primarily. For the orthopedic patient population with shoulder pain, knee pain, etc. I will do a full work up with imaging and a thorough examination. I prefer steroid injections, if needed, and work with the patient to come up with a reasonable home exercise program or refer to PT or OT for a structured and guided program. Additionally, I perform trigger point injections for patients the myofascial pain complaints. These patients often have significant muscle and soft tissue tenderness, and trigger point injections are a good way to jump-start pain relief. Lastly, I perform EMGs and Botox injections.

Q: What is an EMG?
A:
EMG stand for electromyography. This is done in conjunction with nerve conduction studies or NCS. An EMG is often ordered to assess for conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome, radiculopathy, or peripheral neuropathy. Your doctor may refer you for an EMG if you have numbness in your hands or feet, if you have back or neck pain with symptoms in your arms and legs, or if you have weakness in your extremities. The test consists of two parts. For the NCS, I use a probe to send small shocks down the nerves of the arms or legs. This feels like a small jolt. For the EMG portion, I use a small needle to listen to the activity of the muscles in the arms or legs. The test itself takes anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. I describe it as uncomfortable more than painful. And I can assure you I’ve had it done to me more than once. The test is helpful both for diagnosis of certain conditions as well as to determine the severity and whether surgery is needed.

Q: What conditions do you treat with Botox and what does the procedure entail?
A:
I use Botox to treat chronic migraines, cervical dystonia, and spasticity. Spasticity is the tightening of muscles that often occurs following neurologic insults, such as strokes or spinal cord injuries. Though Botox is not for everyone, I do think many people, particularly those with chronic migraines or muscle tightness after stroke, could benefit from an evaluation to see if Botox is the right treatment for them. The procedure itself only takes a few minutes in the office. I use a small needle to enter the muscles in which I will inject the medication. Following the procedure, the patient often notes improvement over a few days, which continues to increase with time. The procedure can be done every 3 months.